EnglishEspañol中文(简体)Português
Translations by Bing™

Navigating the Pandemic

Navigating the Pandemic

Navigating the Pandemic

An export management company leader’s view on navigating the pandemic

It’s been eight weeks since we suspended all corporate travel and arranged for our entire New York staff to work from home. These were big adjustments for our 24 mostly internationally based field sales managers used to being on the road and our 40 New York team members accustomed to working together at headquarters.

Like everyone, we’ve been relying heavily during the coronavirus pandemic on video conferencing to keep us connected and meet with our customers and our manufacturer clients. We’ve benefited greatly also from a document management system that we implemented over the last couple of years that enables us to retrieve and share documents electronically.

We enjoyed a solid, if not spectacular, first quarter, as many of our markets remained active through the second or third week of March, but by the beginning of April, our order activity slowed to a trickle, as almost all major export markets by then had shut down. It was clear then that we were heading into some rough months ahead.

Like most U.S. companies of our size, we applied for the relief made available from our federal government. The relief we received will help us keep our staff intact through the middle of June. After that, if our markets don’t recover, we’ll need to consider other ways to reduce costs.

In the absence of a vaccine or, at the very least, widely available testing, it is hard to predict when our New York staff will return to the office. Even less clear is when our sales managers will begin to travel again, as the safety of air travel and health conditions in many international markets will likely remain questions long after businesses re-open in the U.S.

Success containing the pandemic’s spread has varied greatly from one country to the next. A Dorian Drake sales manager based in Beijing, Tony Wang, reports that China has re-opened its economy and people there are traveling again, whereas another based in Spain, Juan Gomez, advises that the country will remain in some form of lock-down for at least two more months. Germany and New Zealand have largely contained the virus’ spread, whereas some Latin American countries, most notably Brazil and Ecuador, have struggled to contain it.

With travel suspended and global trade curtailed, we’ve been thinking a lot about what permanent changes the pandemic will bring. While the long-term implications remain unclear, for now we’ve been sending different, more frequent e-mail promotions, expanding our presence on various social media platforms, coordinating a wide range of product training webinars for our customers, and relying heavily on video conferencing to meet with customers and each other, ironically in some instances bringing us closer than we were before. And, of course, our sales managers continue to reach out to their customers wherever they are, whether via phone, WhatsApp, or LinkedIn.

So how long before things return to normal? Some medical experts think it could take years. In the meantime, we continue to live in a scary world, with more than three-and-a-half million diagnosed Covid-19 cases globally (surely just a fraction of those actually infected), more than 250,000 reported deaths, and enormous economic disruption, with more than 30 million unemployed in the U.S. alone. It is a time not only of fear but also frustration, cooped up in our homes, unable to work with our colleagues, visit customers, pursue the things we love, or socialize with family and friends.

I have talked to a few friends who have been using the time at home to clear their closets, go through the box of letters left behind by a deceased parent, read the book they had been meaning to read for years, or simply make needed time to pause and reflect. For many of us who live our lives at something approximating warped speed, perhaps the added down time imposed on us is a blessing in disguise.

Ed Dorian beard, President of Dorian Drake International - Covid-19 positive

The author, now fully recovered and working from home

My own experience with the pandemic started the second week of March. Feeling run down, I opted to stay home for a few days to recover. When a few days stretched beyond a week, and my condition worsened, I checked into a hospital, where I tested positive for Covid-19 and pneumonia. Extremely weak, my breathing labored, I was placed in intensive care. My first day in the hospital was extremely difficult—a doctor told me later he wasn’t sure I was going to make it—but with each passing day I felt a little better. I was moved out of ICU on the eighth day of what turned out to be a twelve-day stay. Seeing now the mounting fatalities here in the United States—many young, healthy people among them—it’s clear to me how lucky I am to have made it through.

During my final days in the hospital, awaiting my discharge, I found myself reflecting upon the many things that bring me joy: traveling abroad to visit key accounts or work an international trade show; distributing bonus checks to our staff after a successful year; playing a round of golf with friends; enjoying a vacation somewhere new and different with my wife and sons; walking with my wife on an empty beach near our weekend home in Cape Cod. Knowing these things would all be possible again instilled me with a sense of heightened appreciation. I will never take them for granted again.

I shared this sentiment recently with an old friend, who said, “I think we’re all going to feel that way when this is finally behind us.” I hope he’s right. Focusing on what we appreciate helps us maintain perspective and keep our lives on a positive track. This might never be more important than it is right now.

 

Ed Dorian Jr.
White Plains, NY
May 7, 2020

 

26 thoughts on “Navigating the Pandemic

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Prakesh,

      Thank you for you kind words. Hope you, your family, and your colleagues at New Priti are safely navigating the pandemic in India.

      Best regards,
      Ed

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Rob,

      Glad you enjoyed it. Hope you, your family, and the Country Clipper team are faring well during this crazy time.

      Regards to all,
      Ed

  1. Paul M. -Biro Mfg.

    Congratulations Ed on beating the virus. God was watching over you. Take care , regain your strength. Say a prayer for those who are still suffering the scourge of this pandemic and for those who still need our help.

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Paul,

      Many thanks for your words of encouragement and prayerful thoughts about those who are worse off. Let us all hope the medical community develops an effective vaccine soon. Wishing you, your family, and the team at Biro safe passage until then.

      Best regards,
      Ed

  2. Bill Hudson

    Ed,
    Thank you so much fro your insights and words of encouragement. Your own personal story is very inspiring. I am so glad that you are healthy now and able to spread the joy you expressed in your letter.
    God Bless you and your team Ed.
    Best,
    Bill Hudson

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks for your kind words. Glad you enjoyed the post. Hope you, your family, and the team at Hudson remain healthy and safe.

      Warmest regards,
      Ed

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Chris,

      Glad you liked the post. Hope you, your family, and your colleagues at Nemco have remained healthy and safe during this challenging time.

      Best regards,
      Ed

  3. Clyde Persad - Laughlin & De Gannes Limited

    Hello Ed,

    Many thanks for the insight. This is useful in moving forward into an uncertain business world. We are extremely happy that you have lived to tell the tale. Best to you and your family and keep on doing what you do.

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Clyde,

      Thanks for your kind words. Glad you found our story useful. Every business is looking for ways to re-invent itself now. Hope you, your, family, and your colleagues at Laughlin & De Gannes remain healthy and safe.

      Best regards,
      Ed

  4. Phil Coleman

    Hi Ed,

    I had no idea you went through this scary episode, however I’m so glad you’ve emerged heathy, (perhaps a little less wealthy) and wiser. I’ve always enjoyed your insightful blogs, this one you nailed. Thanks for sharing this story of encouragement!

    Phil

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Phil,

      Thanks for your note. Glad you liked the post. I hope you, your family, and the Giles team are doing well and remain healthy and safe.

      Best regards,
      Ed

  5. Vic McGrady

    Hello, Ed. Quite a story. Glad to hear you conquered this beast. Wish you and your family all the best going forward–as well as all the wonderful caregivers who risk so much to help all of us. Take care and best regards, Vic McGrady

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Vic,

      Thanks for your note. Yes, it was quite an ordeal. I was very fortunate to come out OK on the other end. And you’re right about the caregivers. I saw up close many medical techs, nurses, and doctors risking their own lives to care for those of us battling the virus. They deserve all the credit they get–and more. Hope you and your loved well remain healthy and safe.

      Best regards,
      Ed

      Best regards,
      Ed

  6. Amador Garcia

    Hello Ed,

    Inspiring post!. You have a special gift with words. Very inspiring showing caring. I was not aware that you were directly impacted by the Covid-19. You were very fortunate. I hope your family is doing well. Keep safe.

    1. Ed Dorian

      Hi Amador,

      Thanks for your kind words. Glad you liked the post. I was very fortunate, indeed.

      Hope you and your family remain healthy and safe during this crazy time.

      Best regards,
      Ed

  7. Riaz Hussain

    Hi Ed, Riaz this side. Happy to hear that good news, that you recovered and back to normal. An ex Dorain drake, I know the efforts you put in day today activities of DDI and how passionate you with your job.
    Now you can very soon start your Golf and half marathons again with Sig and girls.
    This article reminds me about the quotes you use on open book management. True fighter never fails, be bold and open.
    I truly believe in Almighty and praying to him to keep you healthy always not only to take care of your family but to take care of whole DDI family. Take care and keep fit.
    Riaz, Dubai

  8. Ed Dorian

    Hi Riaz,

    Thanks for your kind words and prayers. It is great to hear from you.

    I’m still working myself back into shape: 35 minutes a day on a treadmill, intervals of walking and running, a little more running every day. I think my long-term commitment to running definitely helped me recover.

    I think of you often and wish the best for you and your family. I hope all of you remain healthy and safe during this difficult time.

    Best personal regards,
    Ed

  9. Dave S.

    Hi Ed,

    So glad to hear that you made it through. What an ordeal that must have been.

    Fortunately your staff has a level of long-term credibility and confidence with customers that will be hard to replicate.

    “I will never take them for granted again.” Wise words indeed.

    Stay well.

    Dave S.

  10. Ed Dorian

    Hi Dave,

    Great to hear from you, Dave, and many thanks for your kind words.

    An ordeal, indeed. I definitely dodged a bullet.

    You’re right about our staff. As talented and tough as they come.

    Hope you and your family remain healthy and safe.

    Best regards,
    Ed

  11. Armen Shahinian

    I love both your indomitable spirit and compassion! Quite a combination! All the best for your business and family as the whole world battles through this. Armen

  12. Edward Dorian

    Hi Armen,

    Thanks for your kind words. Crazy time for all of us. Thanks again for your friendship and support.

    Best,
    Ed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *